Jana Müller

Jana is comfortable working with watercolour, acrylic and oil paint, ink, collage and clay, as well as various forms of print-making techniques including linocut, dry point etching, traditional etching and monoprints in various mediums. She is inspired by many local and international artists namely Christiaan Diedericks, William Kentridge, Benon Lutaaya, Candy le Sueur, Tina Berning, Henk Serfontein, Balekane Legoabe and Frida Kahlo.

About Jana Müller:

Jana Müller, originally from Namibia formally started art classes with Nanette Ranger in Paarl in 2014. Although she studied art at high school at the Diocesan School for Girls, Grahamstown, her travels across South Africa after graduation as a physiotherapist introduced her to a number of willing mentors across the country. Jana has lived in the Eastern Cape, Kwa-Zulu Natal, Mpumalanga and the Western Cape and has informally attended classes after hours under the guidance of Louise Wybrow, Corina Lemmer, Nanette Ranger and more recently Adrian Ranger. Although Jana works in rural health professions education at Stellenbosch University she continues with art and has been exhibited with fellow artists in Stellenbosch, Paarl and Wellington since 2014. She had her first solo exhibition in 2019: Alleensaam at the Breytenbach Art Gallery in Wellington.

Her work:

Jana is comfortable working with watercolour, acrylic and oil paint, ink, collage and clay, as well as various forms of print-making techniques including linocut, dry point etching, traditional etching and monoprints in various mediums. She is inspired by many local and international artists namely Christiaan Diedericks, William Kentridge, Benon Lutaaya, Candy le Sueur, Tina Berning, Henk Serfontein, Balekane Legoabe and Frida Kahlo

Her transition to print-making stemmed from a desire to move away from drawing with precision and to embrace the unexpected and often surprising results of print-making. The versatility of the techniques and endless possibility for creating, recreating, reusing, remodeling and reproducing imperfect pieces of art has become somewhat of an addiction and a therapy. Jana confesses that she has always admired poets and writers who are gifted with words in describing the indescribable agonies and ecstasies of life. Visual art is her way of expressing what her words cannot.